Forest Fire Danger Level

Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Daily Forest Fire Danger Report.


Mission Statement

The mission of the Sandy Hook Vol. Fire & Rescue Co., Inc. is to strive for excellence in the performance of prevention of loss of life, personal injury and damage from fire, medical and other emergencies of any or all persons when called upon. We shall do this by maintaining a high standard of training and public education and act and perform in a safe, courteous and professional manner.


Patches

If you would like a patch please send a request, and $5, to

Sandy Hook Vol. Fire & Rescue Company

Attn:  Patch Request

PO Box 783

Sandy Hook CT 06482


Purchase Reflective Signs

 HELP US FIND YOU FASTER!! 

IF WE CAN'T SEE YOUR HOUSE NUMBER FROM THE SEAT OF THE VEHICLES RESPONDING TO AN EMERGENCY, IT COULD DELAY OUR RESPONSE AS WELL AS THE RESPONSE OF OTHER EMERGENCY SERVICE PROVIDERS. 

Reflective signs are available from Sandy Hook Volunteeer Fire & Rescue.

They can be purchased for $15

Stop by the firehouse any Monday night or call 270-4392 to place an order!  


The Fireman's Prayer

A Fireman's Prayer
 
When I am called to duty, God
Wherever flames may rage,
Give me strength to save some life
Whatever be its age.
Help me embrace a little child
Before it is too late
Or save an older person from
The horror of that fate.
Enable me to be alert and hear the weakest shout
And quickly and efficiently
To put the fire out.
I want to fill my calling and
To give the best in me,
To guard my every neighbor and
Protect his property.
And if according to my fate
I am to lose my life,
Please bless with your protecting hand
My children and my wife. 

Contact Information

Sandy Hook Vol. Fire and Rescue
18-20 Riverside Rd/Po Box 783
Sandy Hook, CT  06482

Non-Emergency:
203-270-4392

Emergency:
911

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12th Annual Fill The Fire Truck Food Drive
Sat. Nov 17th 2012

On Saturday, November 17, firefighters from all five of Newtown's companies collaborated for the 12th annual Fill The Fire Truck Food Drive, a five-hour event that works to restock the shelves, refrigerator and freezer at FAITH Food Pantry in Sandy Hook.

Firefighters, friends and family from Sandy Hook, Hawleyville and Hook & Ladder were stationed outside Big Y Supermarket on Queen Street, while a similar group representing Botsford and Dodgingtown took up their traditional position outside Stop & Shop in Sand Hill Plaza.

At the end of the day,37 turkeys, two hams, 148 boxes of food and more than $800 in cash and gift cards were driven to Washington Avenue, delivered to the food pantry.

In addition to the firefighters and supporters who volunteered their time, event organizer Karin Halstead offers her thanks to Big Y and Stop & Shop for allowing the apparatus to be parked in front of their stores for this important event. She also sends thanks to Curtis Packaging in Sandy Hook, which donated boxes to be used to gather the food on Saturday.

 




Members of Sandy Hook, Hawleyville and Hook & Ladder fire companies received donations in front of Big Y. (Andrew Goroski/Newtown Bee photo)



Botsford and Dodgingtown members collected items for FAITH Food Pantry in front of Stop & Shop. (Andrew Gorosko/Newtown Bee photo)



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Always Remember

Boston Fire: Lt Edward J. Walsh, Jr, age 43; and Firefighter Michael R. Kennedy, age 33. 

Both were killed while battling a nine-alarm fire on Beacon Street, in Boston's Back Bay district.


Fire Prevention

Learn About Smoke Alarms

Why should I have a working smoke alarm?

A properly installed and maintained smoke alarm is the only thing in your home that can alert you and your family to a fire 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Whether you’re awake or asleep, a working smoke alarm is constantly on alert, scanning the air for fire and smoke.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in properties without working smoke alarms. A working smoke alarm significantly increases your chances of surviving a deadly home fire.

What types of smoke alarms are available?

 There are many different brands of smoke alarms available on the market, but they fall under two basic types: ionization and photoelectric.

It cannot be stated definitively that one is better than the other in every fire situation that could arise in a residence. Because both ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms are better at detecting distinctly different, yet potentially fatal fires, and because no one can predict what type of fire might start in a home, the USFA recommends that every residence and place where people sleep be equipped with:

  • Both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms, OR
  • dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors

In addition to the basic types of alarms, there are alarms made to meet the needs of people with hearing disabilities. These alarms may use strobe lights that flash and/or vibrate to assist in alerting those who are unable to hear standard smoke alarms when they sound.

What powers a smoke alarm?

Smoke alarms are powered by battery or they are hardwired into the home’s electrical system. If the smoke alarm is powered by battery, it runs on either a disposable 9-volt battery or a non-replaceable 10-year lithium (“long-life”) battery. A backup battery is usually present on hardwired alarms and may need to be replaced.

These batteries must be tested on a regular basis and, in most cases, should be replaced at least once each year (except for lithium batteries). See the Smoke Alarm Maintenance section for more information.

Are smoke alarms expensive?

Smoke alarms are not expensive and are worth the lives they can help save. Ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms cost between $6 and $20. Dual sensor smoke alarms cost between $24 and $40.
 

Some fire departments offer reduced price, or even free, smoke alarms. Contact your local fire department’s non-emergency phone number for more information.

Install smoke alarms in key areas of your home

Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement. Many fatal fires begin late at night or early in the morning, so the U.S. Fire Administration recommends installing smoke alarms both inside and outside of sleeping areas.

Since smoke and many deadly gases rise, installing your smoke alarms at the proper level will provide you with the earliest warning possible. Always follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions.

Some fire departments will install battery-operated smoke alarms in your home at no cost. Contact your local fire department’s non-emergency phone number for more information.

Hardwired smoke alarms should be installed by a qualified electrician.

Smoke alarm maintenance

 Is your smoke alarm still working? Smoke alarms must be maintained! A smoke alarm with a dead or missing battery is the same as having no smoke alarm at all.

A smoke alarm only works when it is properly installed and maintained. Depending on how your smoke alarm is powered (9-volt, 10-year lithium, or hardwired), you’ll have to maintain it according to manufacturer’s instructions. General guidelines for smoke alarm maintenance:

Smoke alarm powered by a 9-volt battery

  • Test the alarm monthly.
  • Replace the batteries at least once per year.
  • The entire smoke alarm unit should be replaced every 8-10 years.

Smoke alarm powered by a 10-year lithium (or “long life”) battery

  • Test the alarm monthly.
  • Since you cannot (and should not) replace the lithium battery, the entire smoke alarm unit should be replaced according to manufacturer’s instructions.

Smoke alarm that is hardwired into the home’s electrical system

  • Test the alarm monthly.
  • The backup battery should be replaced at least once per year.
  • The entire smoke alarm unit should be replaced every 8-10 years.

Never disable a smoke alarm while cooking

A smoke alarm is just doing its job when it sounds while you’re cooking or taking a shower with lots of steam.

  • If a smoke alarm sounds while you’re cooking or taking a shower with lots of steam, do not remove the battery. You should:
  • Open a window or door and press the “hush” button,
  • Wave a towel at the alarm to clear the air, or
  • Move the entire alarm several feet away from the location.

Disabling a smoke alarm or removing the battery can be a deadly mistake.

State-by-State Residential Smoke Alarm Requirements

The USFA compiled state-by-state residential guidelines for smoke alarms. Families can find life-saving fire safety tips required or suggested by their very own state. The guidelines include instructions on the installation and maintenance of smoke alarms. The tips will help families do their part to protect themselves and the firefighters who protect their lives!

 

Courtesy of US Fire Admin. - FEMA


Upcoming Events

7:00pm
Every 2nd Monday
Junior Corps Meeting


7:00pm - 8:00pm
Every 2nd Tuesday
Ladies Auxiliary Meeting


7:30pm
Every 3rd Monday
Business Meeting


6:30pm - 9:00pm
Mon. Apr 28th 2014
Drill: Natural Gas & Propane Emergency Preparedness


8:30am - 12:00pm
Sun. May 4th 2014
Drill: Hazmat Recert


8:15pm
Mon. May 5th 2014
Special Meeting

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